Category Archives: Features

Rookie Quarterbacks and the Race to Start

**(Hey so remember when I said that I was stepping away from the Cooler? That was apparently a lie.)

manziel bridgewater bortles

Have you ever seen baby turtles hatch from a nest? It’s frantic free for all. Hundreds of minute-old turtles scramble for their lives on the beach as seagulls swoop down from above and eat them whole. It’s a truly mesmerizing and horrific scene found in nature. The same happens with NFL quarterbacks. There are countless young players from robust programs with their own pages of the record books that are indiscriminately swallowed whole and crapped out onto your car. The benching of Blake Bortles, Teddy Bridgewater, and Johnny Manziel is a welcoming reminder of that fact.

Why? All three quarterbacks were taken in the first round and none of them will be starting on opening day. Many fans will see this news as a disappointment on the player’s part or a poor managerial decision by the coaching staff, which is grossly unfair. Just because it has become the norm for teams to trot out rookie QB’s doesn’t mean that it’s right. The main argument from the angry masses:

“He’s a first round pick!”

I hate this complaint. It’s short-sighted and misguided and generally makes me want to slap you in the face (it’s more rewarding than a punch!). Let me explain by stating a few simple things:

  1. College football and professional football and not the same game. Out of the 11 Heisman winners prior to Manziel in 2012, seven of them have been duds at the NFL level. The other four (Carson Palmer, Mark Ingram, Cam Newton, and Robert Griffin III) have had varying degrees of success. Success in college does not directly translate to the pros. the same even goes for coaches.
  2. First round picks in all sports are based on potential, not immediate impact. Sure, I could use a Thunderstone to evolve my Pikachu at level 5, but my Raichu is not going to be nearly as badass, nahmean? Some top talents need time to develop. Remember Drew Brees in San Diego?
  3. Human error exists. This last fact more or less covers the idea that some players get selected in the first round that have no business doing so. These players were misjudged by often desperate and/or simply bad teams and were then unfairly classified. For examples, consult your local Raiders fan!

With that argument dead and buried, let’s move on to the next major complaint:

“He should get the experience!”

This is slap-worthy as well because the phrase by default means that sitting on the bench is not a means of gaining experience. However, there is value in waiting and watching and learning. The idea of “the game slowing down” is often mentioned by players who are looking to make the leap. The adjustments within the system come naturally, allowing them to play without hesitation. Also, when you consider that a rookie QB has four to five months before the season starts and the majority of that time is spent in shorts against no pressure, it’s reasonable to believe that some aren’t ready to play, no?

So while Bortles, Manziel, and Bridgewater are first round picks and starting experience would be nice, it’s important to understand that sometimes the best way for a turtle to reach the ocean is to zig-zag rather than run a straight line. 

Is Chip Kelly in for a Sophomore Slump?

Chip KellyRejoice! The doldrums of summer, and the seemingly-endless stream of unsubstantiated speculation about the coming season is mercifully subsiding. Eagles training camp is here, and thus marks the official unofficial start of the 2014 NFL season. Huzzah! Now we have some actual news to read about!

But games that count are still quite a ways away, and something has been bugging me. While perusing the various forms of Philadelphia sports talk-radio over the last couple of weeks (Hey! Have you heard our excellent podcast yet?), I noticed that one of the more persistent topics of unsubstantiated conjecture debate has been “Are Chip Kelly’s Eagles going to improve or decline in year two?”

The argument generally breaks down into one of two run-on sentences: 1) Chip’s offense has been torn apart in NFL film rooms all offseason, and it’s a college offense anyway, and it was sort of a flukey year, and the defense still sucks, so the Eagles will be worse in 2014, or 2) Chip is a genius, so when opposing teams make adjustments, Chip’ll adjust them right back, the team is used to Chip now, and the defense didn’t get any worse but the offense is gonna get better, so the Eagles will be better than last year.

Frankly, both sides make a somewhat cogent point. What bothers me – what always bothers me – is the lack of context…

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No-Hit? No $hit – The Devolution of the Philadelphia Phillies (Part One)

 

It’s about 2 a.m. on a humid Wednesday morning. My sporadic insomnia has sent me to my comfort zone, YouTube, where I watch the usual—TED talks, WorldStar Vine compilations, and some of the weird stuff, like the effects of a cluster headache. But on this night, as my copy of Turn Blue by The Black Keys uploads to my iTunes, I watched scientist Bill Nye debate author Ken Ham on Evolution versus Creationism.

To keep things as organic and objective as possible, I won’t share my thoughts. But I think there is one theory we can all agree on— the theory of ‘Devolution.’

When it comes to the Philadelphia Phillies, Los Angeles Dodgers’ right hander Josh Beckett’s no-hitter in a 6-0 win Sunday at Citizens Bank Park completes the Phillies’ transformation from a Major League powerhouse, to a Major League laughing stock.

Devolution: The act of reverse evolution. This word has been coined by the band “Devo”. Devolution is a process which mankind is permanently engaged in, and is irreversible. There’s nothing one can do about it, so enjoy the ride. (Source: Urban Dictionary)

According to Urban Dictionary’s definition, society is devolving at a rate that we can no longer control. While there may be some truth in that—we are a world that went from loving Beethoven, to adoring Led Zeppelin, to current hysteria over Miley Cyrus—we can’t deny the steady downfall that Ruben Amaro Jr.’s reign has awarded the Phillies; one that transitioned the team from a World Series champion, to a team that sits alone at the bottom of the National League East standings.

But how did the team get to the point that it was no-hit for the first time since St. Louis Cardinals’ righty Bob Forsch silenced the Phillies’ bats in 1978?

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On Donald Sterling: Now I’m Angry

(Credit: CNN)

(Credit: CNN)

DISCLAIMER: I don’t tend to do this often. Rarely do I want to bring my own personal life or philosophies outside of sports into my writing but certain instances warrant such a response.

I have always held the belief that sports are a canvas for what we would ideally want life to be like. Everyone can be included based off their merit, despite any other traits or beliefs that they might hold. Everyone is respected and appreciated to the extent that they earn. Everyone is allowed to partake and have fun.

Following the Donald Sterling one-on-one interview that aired on Monday night on CNN, my feelings toward the entire debacle elevated to a new level.

I’M ANGRY.

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Mocking the Draftniks: Are NFL draft “experts” actually any good at mock drafting?

“Say what?”

[Note: This is a write-up that Hank did last year following the 2013 draft, but it’s still totally accurate and well worth your time.] 

Mock drafts are stupid.

There, I said it. You and I know that as much as we all love them, they’re not consequential. They’re not inherently insightful. They’re often nothing more than speculative conversation pieces. At best, they’re educated guesswork.

Now I’m likely to be dragged to the town square and stoned for saying that, but so be it, it needed to be said. I’ll die a martyr for the cause of reasonable, retrospective sports analysis. A worthy ideal, certainly.

Sarcasm aside, I really was convinced that if there ever were a year when I could successfully prove that the draftniks really are all just soothsaying con-men, this was the year. There were no sure-fire top-5 quarterbacks, no stud wide outs or corners. No truly obvious picks. The consensus seemed to be that the real talent in this draft was along the lines, some of the hardest positions in the sport to scout. If there really is such a thing as a “draft guru,” this is the kind of draft that would expose him as either a true expert or a useless hack.

With this hypothesis in mind, I collected an assortment of 14 “final” 1st-round mock drafts published before the draft started last Thursday. As a control, I asked my buddy Frank to submit his own 1st-round mock. Frank watches far more college and pro football than anybody can reasonably consider healthy, but he’s not a paid analyst, nor does he have a support team, league sources, game film, nor any other resources that pro analysts or sports columnists can access.

Here’s what I found out.

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You’ll Never Forget Where You Were When Undertaker’s Streak Ended

Brock Lesnar defeated the Undertaker at Wrestlemania XXX, ending his Wreslemania win streak at 21.

Brock Lesnar defeated the Undertaker at Wrestlemania XXX, ending his Wrestlemania win streak at 21. (Credit: wwe.com)

[Note from Vince: This is the first article from Mark Whited here at the Cooler, he’ll be giving us a special look into anything and everything sports. He’s also known for his famous invention: the Can You Smell What the Rock is Cookin’? Scratch and Sniff game!]

Sunday night marked the 30th installment of the yearly World Wrestling Entertainment spectacle known as Wrestlemania.  Writing the final chapter of a controversial year for the company – a year which saw fan favorite CM Punk leave – the biggest controversy of all may have been when Brock Lesnar pinned the Undertaker in front of 75,167 fans in New Orleans’ Mercedes-Benz Superdome, ending his legendary Wrestlemania win streak at 21 consecutive victories.

With that moment, fans of the wrestling industry were left shocked. Whether you were at the Superdome or in your living room, you could hear a pin drop. The unexpected, the impossible, the unbelievable had happened. Social media exploded as fans took to Twitter, making the event the No.1 trending topic worldwide.

Though it was scripted, the reaction could not be. You didn’t even need to have been a fan. Somehow, someway, you came across news of the Undertaker’s defeat and understood the awesome circumstances of what had happened.

Like myself, you’ll never forget where you were when the Undertaker’s streak came to an end.

I was headed eastbound on the Market-Frankford Line, leaving York-Dauphin Station in the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia. I spent most of the night at an Alcoholics and Narcotics Anonymous clubhouse. I was there doing research and interviewing recovering drug addicts for an article that I was writing on the neighborhood’s drug culture.

While Daniel Bryan was busy beating Triple H in his first of two matches, I was listening to someone tell me about the worst moments of his life – about being homeless, losing his entire family, ending up in prison and eventually ending up at The Last Stop, an outreach clubhouse which acts as a rehabilitation program for those struggling to break their addictive habits.

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Naismith Basketball HOF Adding Some Local Flavor

Carla Gugino starred as Cathy Rush in 'The Mighty Macs.' (credit: IMDB.com)

Carla Gugino starred as Cathy Rush in ‘The Mighty Macs.’ (credit: IMDB.com)

The class for the 2014 Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame was released yesterday. The group is headlined by NBA greats Alonzo Mourning and Mitch Richmond, former outspoken Alabama Head Coach and National Champion Nolan Richardson and recently retired NBA commissioner David Stern.

The list of 2014 honorees also has its own sense of local flavor.

Going into the hall this year will be former Temple basketball great, Guy Rodgers and the 1972-74 Immaculata Women’s Basketball team.

Rodgers was elected into the hall via the Veterans Committee. Rodgers led Temple University to two Final Four appearances in 1956 and 1958. Rodgers was a unanimous First Team All American in 1958 and made the All-Tournament team that year.

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If the NFL moves the Extra Point, this is why smart teams will stop kicking them entirely…

Shout out to the pro-football-reference.com database for the stats in this article. You guys rock.

So we’ve all heard the rumblings from the NFL’s competition committee recently: “The extra point is sort of boring. Let’s screw with it!” seems to be the general gist of the conversation.

The Commish himself has gone on record about his distaste for the extra point. “I believe we had five missed extra points this year out of 1,200 some odd. So it’s a very small fraction of the play, and you want to add excitement with every play.”

The gripe might be legitimate. In the last ten season, NFL kickers have completed the extra point attempt a whopping 98.9% of the time (11058 attempts). In 2013, the success rate was 99.6% (1267 attempts). This is as close to automatic as it is going to get in the NFL. The problem, of course, is that there are still 21 players besides the kicker on the field, so major injuries can still occur. Rob Gronkowski, the Pats’ ginormous, extraordinarily gifted tight end, famously broke his forearm on a simple extra-point attempt. While that was a highly visible incident, there are undoubtedly countless, unreported minor traumas that occur during extra point attempts every season. The logic is that the 1.1% of kicks that aren’t made are outweighed in importance by the danger of the play.

Goodell intimated that there are several proposals to change the rule, including one where the point is automatically given after the touchdown unless the offense wants to attempt a two-point conversion. But football purists are certain to be appalled by the idea of taking another step to remove feet from football, so this complete removal of the kick attempt would be a fairly radical move to make in one fell swoop.

So the NFL competition committee is floating a compromise idea: Move extra point kick attempts to the 25 yard line, making the kick a 42 yard attempt rather than its current 19. This solution makes some sense on its face. Teams are still allowed the option of attempting a slightly-riskier but still very makeable extra point, or they can go for the two-point play from the regular spot two yards out. This presumably would leave the strategy of the game intact but provide for a more interesting post-touchdown play.

But this proposal has a major flaw: Any team that chooses to kick in that scenario is run by stupid people. Here’s why:

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

TL;DR

If they move the extra point kick back pretty much at all, statistically minded coaches will stop attempting it almost completely. There’s a graph above that says so! The yellow line is how much extra points would be “worth” on average from a given yardage, and the horizontal lines are multiple approximations for the expected points of any regular two-point conversion attempt. Extra Point attempts start being worth less than two-point conversions if they are attempted from 15-16 yards out, so if the extra point were moved to the 25, smart teams would go for two almost every time.

I’ll admit the above graph doesn’t have the best labels in the world, so please allow me to elaborate. Explanation after the jump.

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Playoff Talk with 3D Philly Sports!

The year has turned, snow is in the air and the music of the playoffs is in our hearts. Our Birds will be making the push to a Superbowl and we decided to chat with our pals over at 3DPhillySports about what could be a cinderella story. Joining us to break down Saturday’s game as well as the league-wide goodness are Derrick AlvarezDave BennettRandy Jobst. Hank and I give our take as well.

First, the Birds!

The Eagles are in the playoffs! Does this make Chip Kelly Coach of the Year?

Derrick: If I had the option, I’d probably split the vote up. One half for Bruce Arians, the other half for Chip Kelly. If I had to pick one though, I’ll go with the team that made the playoffs and beat Bruce Arians on their way there. Great season for the Birds.
 
Randy: It makes him a great candidate to win the award, but you can make a serious argument for several other coaches too. Andy Reid took a 2-14 team and turned them into an 11 win team in just one season. Ron Rivera went into the season as the coach we were all waiting to get fired. Fast forward a few months and he is watching the opening round of the playoffs from his couch, but only because his team earned a first round bye. You also have to consider how dominate Seattle was at times this season. Chip is very deserving, but so are those other three mentions as well. This award is a toss-up this year. I hope Chip gets it, but I wouldn’t be offended if he didn’t.
Hank: He has to be. He’s brought in a system that is, if not wholly unprecedented at the NFL level, at least a truly genuine attempt to rethink the formula that leads to success in the NFL. It’s a passing league, and the Eagles’ offense is putting up ridiculous numbers while leaning on the run.
Vince: I think there’s some good candidates but Chip has to be the guy. He’s doing some pretty wild and innovative stuff in what has been a league based on parity while shattering records along the way. If I had any money, I’d bet it on him.

Which player on the team (outside of Foles and McCoy) is most pivotal to the team’s success?

Derrick: Desean Jackson. If a team is able to even hold him under 50-60 yards then they have an excellent chance at defeating the Eagles. He’s a home run hitter that has had one helluva season in 2013. 
Randy: Trent Cole. This defense depends on a good pass-rush and Cole is the most capable of wreaking havoc on an opposing backfield each week. When he gets shut down with just one blocker, this defense struggles to get much penetration. When he gets after the quarterback early, the defense appears to be a top-10 group, just ask the Bears.
Hank: I think it’s either Jason Peters or Evan Mathis. For all the success that Fletcher Cox or Brandon Boykin had on defense this year, none of this would be possible without stellar performances on the offensive side of the ball. That starts with the offensive line, specifically the left side. Mathis is a rock, and Peters is a monster. If you’re a DC trying to scheme against this team, good luck picking a player that matches up well against them. 
Vince: Fletcher Cox. I’ve been saying for weeks now that the defensive line is the true heart of our defense and when they’re not beating opposing lines, we’re sunk. That was the case in Dallas where I think we slipped away with an undeserved win. This week the Saints have two Pro Bowl guards protecting a Pro Bowl quarterback. It’s prime time, Fletcher. Get it done.

Are you happy the Eagles drew the Saints over the 49ers?

Derrick: Yes. I’ll take a team that is 3-5 on the road, who also struggled to beat the Bucs and Falcons mind you (this would have made them 1-7) over a team that has marched to two consecutive NFC Championships. Drews Brees always scares me, but force 2 turnovers from him and I think the Eagles have a first-round W.
Randy: This is the playoffs. I don’t care who you play, everybody is good at this point. The 49ers are a mediocre passing offense at best, but the Saints are a mediocre running offense at best. Both teams have their strengths and their weaknesses and either way you are going to face an elite receiving tight end. I’m happy with the Saints here because it means the 49ers and Seahawks could face-off next weekend. That’s a good thing for everyone in the playoffs who don’t reside in San Fran or Seatle.
Hank: No. Chip beat Harbaugh a couple of times in the college ranks, and frankly Kaepernick is two tiers below Brees right now. I think the Eagles’ passing D, which remains the team’s biggest weakness, would have a much easier time handling the 49ers. Look for a shootout next Sunday, and don’t get caught up in that in the dome / out of the dome crap. This Saints group is gonna show up in full force, weather be damned. Look for Jimmy Graham to go 18 catches for 200+ and at least one TD.
Vince: I think that this was the best possible thing that could happen. The Saints on the road makes the entire NFC picture a little weaker so at this point you hope a blind cinderella gets a nut. That’s the expression right?

How far do you expect the Eagles to go?

Derrick: I really have no expectations, just enjoying the ride from a team that I thought would win 8 games max. I’ve got high hopes though.
Randy: It’s ridiculous to expect the Eagles to win this week and be one of the final eight teams left. We all had this team pegged as a 8-win team at best. However, if they do come out of this weekend with a win I really like their chances against Carolina. Regardless of what happens, this has been a great season and everything the Eagles accomplish from here on out is like a bonus round in my mind.
Hank: I would not be surprised if they got bounced by the Saints in the first round. I WOULD be surprised if they got to the NFCCG.
Vince: I was a doubter on this team all season, but screw it. I’m all in. I think this team should be in the NFC Championship game. They’re good at putting up points and generating turnovers. Hell, if Seattle loses this team is a coin flip from the Super Bowl as they play at home for the Conference. Time to call up Tom Coughlin?

Does it bother you seeing Andy Reid in the playoffs?

Derrick: Not at all, but I’m not sure I want to see him make it too far in the playoffs or the phone lines on Philly talk radio will be going nuts, and not in a good way.
Randy: You know it really doesn’t. I have nothing but love for Andy Reid. His work in the red zone is embarrassing at times and we all wished he would run the ball more, but at this point that is a Kansas City problem. Big Red tried to bring home a Lombardi Trophy to Philly, but he just couldn’t get it done. He’s still a class act who loves the people around him. Plus he is still the best interview on draft day. I will continue to root for him when it doesn’t affect the Eagles.
Hank: No. We knew he was still a decent coach, but he was past due for a change of scenery. He walks into a team that’d LOADED with talent, of course he could make it to the dance. Berry, Hali, Alberts, Charles. We’re talking explosive players there. Couple that with a more-or-less ideal quarterback for his system, and suddenly it would have been a surprise if Andy didn’t make it this year.
Vince: Yes. Yes it does. Not because he himself is in, but it’s the manner in which he’s done it. I feel like a crazy person for yelling at him to run the ball for years and now that he does it he’s coaching one of the best teams in the league. I say this in the name of Correll Buckhalter: Fuck you, Andy.

Which playoff team is the biggest surprise this year?

Derrick: Honestly, Riverboat Ron and the Panthers getting the 2 seed and bye week is probably the biggest shocker to me.
Randy: I had the Chiefs projected as the 6th seed in the AFC before the season started so I’d be lying if I said seeing Kansas City in the playoffs is surprising. I was also a huge Mike McCoy fan so I don’t think the Chargers season is a major shocker either. I would say the Panthers are the biggest shock to me. They came into the season with a nice front seven, but a terrible secondary and an average offense with one good target. Give credit to the job the offensive staff has done to turn this team into an efficient unit this season. I had them pegged as a 6-win team.
Hank: Has to be Carolina. Their defense improved dramatically, and it seems to have caught a lot of people off guard. I always thought Cam was gonna be a really, really good player at the NFL level but feared he would suffer from a lack of help. Not so for the Panthers this year. Credit to Rivera and *cough* Sean McDermott for engineering such an impressive turnaround. They’re making the most of their talent (did anybody know who Greg Hardy or Charles Johnson were before last year?) and still have room to grow.
Vince: I honestly have to say the Packers. Green Bay is decimated and they made the playoffs after starting Senece Wallace, Scott Tolzien, and Matt Flynn for seven games. Remember when we made the playoffs on the back of Jeff Garcia? I think this is just as wild.

Which match-up this weekend do you think will be the best game?

Derrick: San Fran/Green Bay. -5 degrees up in Lambeau is must-see TV.
Randy: This one is a no-brainer for me, it’s the 49ers-Packers game. They played a thriller in Week One, plus we saw the Colin Kapernick show take flight in last year’s postseason. Aaron Rodgers is back and has officially shaken off all the rust. Both teams are still pretty flawed, but I wouldn’t want any part of them either. I think this game tops even the Bears-Packers game from last week.
Hank: Saying it’s Eagles v. Saints would be a cop out, so I’m going with Green Bay and SF. Last year’s NFCCG was one of the most entertaining games I’ve ever seen, and their regular season matchup this year was an offensive explosion. Look for fireworks at the tundra this Sunday.
Vince: I actually think that San Fran should beat Green Bay by a solid margin so I’m going to go with Kansas City and Indianapolis. Indy’s a team that has had some serious ups and downs, but if they show up this game will be a ton of fun. You’ll have the first Deacon Jones Award winner Robert Mathis and Andrew Luck trying to upset a very sturdy Chiefs team in Indy. I think it’s a down to the wire matchup.   

You’re making the odds in Vegas: Who’s your favorite to win the Super Bowl?

Derrick: Broncos, who is going to stop their offense? Peyton is long overdue for that 2nd ring. I think he evens things up with his brother in Eli’s home stadium.
Randy:  A lot has changed to make this a much more difficult answer. The Patriots lost Rob Gronkowski for the season and the Seahawks can’t seem to get Percy Harvin healthy. Both of those teams looked like obvious Super Bowl picks to me when all was well, but right now they are both very beatable.Really every team has its limitations right now. Can Peyton Manning deliver in the January cold? Can the Patriots score enough points to go on another playoff run? Are the Bengals good enough to win a Super Bowl without their two best defensive players(Atkins and Hall)? Do the Panthers have enough fire power to win in the postseason? Same goes for the Seahawks.This really is a season where you just try to survive each week. Nobody is dominant enough to expect to win any playoff game right now. Each game should be a dog fight and the most clutch offenses and defenses will come out on top.

I’ll stick with my preseason pick, the Seahawks, because of the home-field advantage and their defense, but I’m not very confident in that pick. Hell I’m almost inclined to pick the Eagles here because they protect the football, run the ball well and the

Hank: Broncos

Vince: Seattle. The best complete team in the league with the best home field advantage will likely play in a cold Super Bowl. Not to know Peyton in the cold, but rather I’m knocking the reliance on the passing game in the cold. Seahawks win. The Peyton legacy takes a tough hit. And Marshawn Lynch lives in a house made of skittles.

Appreciating Brian Westbrook

BrianWestbrookGoing into this week one of the major stories will be (as always) LeSean McCoy. Shady is set to break a couple of the Eagles franchise records on Sunday. One of which will be Brian Westbrook’s 2,104 all-purpose yards en route to the league rushing title. Simply put, he’s having a hell of a season.

Now while all the love will be going to Shady I just wanted to take the time to go back and give my man B-West his props.

Westbrook, a native of Fort Washington, Maryland, was recruited to Villanova and turned into a walking (but hobbled) record book. He had 41 school records, 13 A-10 records, five NCAA records and the I-AA record for all-purpose yards with 9,885.

I was actually fortunate enough to see him play Millersville when I was a kid and it was comical how good he was. Check the box score for yourself it’s incredible. And after that game I was positive Westbrook was going to be a stud. As history would have it, he moved down the main line and into midnight green.

Now we all remember his highlights…hell you may remember where you were for some of them. But the reason I want to give Westbrook his love is because he’s what I consider to be the perfect Philadelphia player. He was an undersized, underrated overachiever that played with a ton of heart (and no drama).

While the 2000’s will always be remembered as Donvan McNabb’s era Westbrook was the heart of those teams. The Eagles were 3-7 without Westbrook in the lineup from 2004-2008 (the pre Shady Era) and 43-26-1 with him in playing in the regular season. Now part of what makes Westbrook so special was that when he was in a game, it was really the only time he played football. He was always so beat up that he was never able to practice, yet he always performed on Sundays. He was a really special player.

All of this isn’t to take anything away from McCoy. He’s the best back in the league and could very well have a Hall of Fame career. However, it’s important to understand that despite all of the madness and the wild success of Shady and the Eagles, Westbrook was just as valuable to the Eagles back in the day.

Much love, B-West.

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